As part of our series on great advising, we are developing tools and resources to help you evaluate and develop your own greatness. See below a list of the many ways greatness is reflected in day-to-day advising interactions.

Circle all that apply. 

  • My student feedback is positive
  • I learn from students
  • Students share their successes – not just their problems with me
  • People across campus know my name
  • I have been elected to or nominated for something
  • I often hear from former students
  • I am invited to graduation ceremonies and other special milestone events
  • Students leave me notes, cards and other tokens of appreciation
  • Students see me for all kinds of things and sometimes just drop by to say hello
  • I have won something recently
  • I am close to my students but maintain good boundaries
  • My students do well and stay in school
  • I have helped students turn around very challenging circumstances
  • I am able to tailor my advice and information to specific student need and circumstance
  • I am able to deliver bad news in ways that students can accept
  • I have many tools in my advising tool box and use them as dictated by student need and circumstance
  • I am creative in my work
  • I participate in workshops, conferences and other professional development activities
  • My work is a reflection of who I am – students know the real me
  • I apply a variety of approaches and methods in my advising
  • I have helped students through crisis
  • Students tell me about themselves, their lives, their hopes and dreams, they don’t just ask questions
  • I listen as much as I talk in appointments
  • I have or am developing deep and broad information about my institution and higher education
  • I have taken the time to develop a statement of advising philosophy
  • I know how to challenge my students in ways that help them grow
  • I help make things easier, faster, simpler, clearer or more doable for students
  • I invent things that are helpful to students
  • I feel engaged in and passionate about my work
  • I see students as unique individuals
  • I know my work is important
  • I have improved programs or processes
  • I am comfortable with failure and know how to help students get beyond a setback
  • I believe in student potential and ability to grow
  • I see myself as an advocate for students
  • I have successfully encouraged students to persist
  • I love what I’m doing
  • My performance reviews reflect my contributions
  • I am very well connected to other advisors, students and faculty
  • I take breaks and have self-care strategies in place
  • I have a lot of ideas about how my program can make things better for students
  • I discuss complex cases with colleagues
  • I am part of a supportive professional network
  • I love to learn and take on new and challenging projects
  • I am humble
  • No matter how much experience I have, I continue to observe advisors I admire and incorporate their methods into my practice
  • I teach and mentor others
  • I am intentional about my career progress
  • I am reflective and aware of my own biases
  • I have fun at work
  • I know my students’ names
  • I create opportunities for students
  • Students have told me that a light bulb went off for them after an advising session
  • I have motivated students to take on challenges
  • I have a role model
  • If I don’t know the answer to something I say so – and try to find out
  • If I misadvise, I take responsibility for it
  • Students know its ok to come back to me for help after an initial appointment
  • I encourage autonomy and independent thinking in my students
  • I tell students when they are doing great work
  • I like students and believe in them

Circled more than half? Wow. You're awesome. 

For more on this project contact

Elizabeth Wilcox ewilcox@berkeley.edu